This isn't about the Gillette ad - It's about society.

Posted on
January 17, 2019

This isn't about the Gillette ad - It's about society.

By: 

A Few things to consider...

There are so many psychological intricacies when it comes to advertising that in itself it can be a bit overwhelming, hard to process. Simply stated, advertising is meant to defend a brand's position. In this case. Gillette is making a brand based statement that is really quite simple.

Our razors are for real men, so be the best man that you can be!  Right?

The position..

So what is a position and why have one? A position is a basic strategy for earning a categorical spot in a consumers mind. A good position is one that relates directly to a targeted consumer. The reality is that when you have a good position you will capture the first space in a clients mind, the place where everything is cataloged and yes, categorized by importance. Even thought this logic is often misplaced, it is in fact a counterintuitive approach to winning your markets heart. Think about this for a moment, you can never be all things to all people. The best in a categorical war will be the best to the right people.

This category...

The goal if this campaign is to resonate with men who value masculinity. Who value the position of being a man's man. An art that socially has diminished over time. Not an assumption on my part, a discussion that has taken a lead the realm of business, psychology and mental health circles.

Consequently, many guys lack purposeful direction and basic social skills. They’re living off, and often with, their parents well into their 20s and even 30s, expanding their childhood into an age once reserved for starting a family and making a career. Philip Zimbardo Ph.D.

These poor excuses for men have the bodies of adults and the mentalities, as well as the social outlook of toddlers. Horny toddlers, but toddlers nonetheless. Paul Hudson

Studies show that men’s testosterone levels have been declining for decades. The most prominent, a 2007 study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, revealed a “substantial” drop in U.S. men’s testosterone levels since the 1980s, with average levels declining by about 1% per year. Forbes

We all seem to forget that decisions to invest in a campaign like this are well thought out and in this case the response, if even in a negative light is probably a shining light in the board room.

The Response...

There is no such thing as bad publicity. Like it or not, this short film is getting attention. Lot's of attention and yes even my attention. So much So that I am sitting here typing away. Regardless of the overtone of public perception. Men who agree with this ad, the content of this ad and the overall meaning of this ad have more thank likely bumped Gillette closer if not already to the number one spot in their minds when it comes to razors. Like it or not, we are hearing about this brand, we are seeing the tweets and posts on linkedin . Celebrity marketers addressing the PR concerns and the list goes on. Keep a mind a simple competitor maybe having good results with the same positioning.

The controversy is not about Gillette...

The simple fact that this is causing an uproar is not about Gillette staking a stand for being a real man. it is about the current state of our society. If this add ran 50 years ago it would be normalcy defined. The bigger issue is the looming question, what does America define as a real man? 

In my humble opinion..

I believe the content of this ad is positive, it is encouraging men to step up and well, be men. I also believe that those who are responding to this ad negatively may have issues with that ( duh ). It is a sad state of affairs when we, as a society do not want better. We want acceptance of anything and everything regardless of the personal convictions held by many.

Prove me wrong and show me how Gillette is saying something bad : Share your comments below.

Sergio DeSoto
Posted on
January 17, 2019
in the
Logic
category